Hypersomnia Foundation

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Celebrate with the Hypersomnia Foundation

Celebrate with HF: Three Years of Awareness, Education, and Research

A message from the new CEO/Chair:

The Hypersomnia Foundation had a great year in 2016! As I look over the list of the year’s accomplishments, I am keenly aware of the tireless dedication and hours of work from the very beginning of HF, that made all this possible: from the founding three years ago through the recent leadership of Cate Murray into a growing non-profit able to achieve so much.

As I begin my term of leadership service, I feel fortunate not only to be working with an incredible Board of Directors, but to have the support of our prestigious Medical and Scientific Advisory Boards.

We also have an important resource in our Advisory and Advocacy Council (known as PAAC): volunteers who have become and will continue to be an important resource for HF’s outreach.

Finally, we are all grateful to our donors who make our work possible, and to the hypersomnia community, for your inspiration. I look forward to working with all of you as we continue on our mission to get #BeyondSleepy!

-Diane Powell

 

The Hypersomnia Foundation, Inc. (HF) is committed to increasing awareness and education about, and research for better understanding of idiopathic hypersomnia and related disorders. Together with the hypersomnia community we celebrate our third year organized as a public 501c3 charity! As an all-volunteer organization, we are proud of our accomplishments for the hypersomnia community in 2016:

  • February 29- HF participated in Rare Disease Day by publishing “A United Effort to Fuel Research on Hypersomnia” in SomnusNooze we updated milestones of the hypersomnia registry, and creating a graphic to share through social media as we prepared to launch mid-year.
  • March 6-11- National Sleep Awareness Week – We reached out to our SomnusNooze audience asking for statements about coping with hypersomnia, and received many poignant and powerful responses. The #BeyondSleepy tag-line was created and images developed to capture as FB/Twitter/LinkedIn profile pictures for sharing and spreading awareness about hypersomnia.
  • May 16–The HF responded to the NIH’s call for input as it was preparing to set its new research agenda for sleep.
  • June 10- A story about idiopathic hypersomnia was on the first page, top of the fold of the Denver Post, as we prepared to host our regional meeting in Denver. We also reached out to new and existing Health Care Providers; distributing 2,000 postcards giving information about hypersomnia, HF, and our regional meeting.
  • June 12- The HF Denver meeting far exceeded our expectations. From the quality of the speakers and their presentations to the number of attendees, and the ability to offer Livestream of the conference due to two generous grants the conference was a huge success.  Over 1500 people viewed the HF meeting via Livestream with slightly more than 70% watching from the US; the rest of the viewers were in 11 other countries, including Australia, Norway, France, the UK.
  • Also on June 12- After two years of seemingly endless revisions and input from researchers, physicians, CoRDS staff, and people with diagnosed with central disorders of hypersomnolence, the Hypersomnia Foundation Registry at CoRDS was launched. This registry, housed through CoRDS (Coordination of Rare Diseases at Sanford), will form the backbone of many future research projects to be conducted by scientists from throughout the world.  The registry will garner new insights into the disease processes and help scientists better understand differences between the various hypersomnia disorders. As of this past December, 447 people have completed the CoRDS registry; a boon to future research! Go to http://www.hypersomniafoundation.org/registry/
  • June 13-14- Three HF board members, at their own personal expense, attended the annual Associated Professional Sleep Societies (APSS) meeting in Denver to learn about the latest sleep research and clinical practices relating to hypersomnia. Numerous scientific talks and poster sessions were attended, and Board Members met young investigators interested in the study of hypersomnia.

And since June:

  • We have developed plans for a SomnusNooze feature called Ask the Doctor.  Members of our Medical Advisory Board (MAB) have graciously offered to answer general questions about idiopathic hypersomnia, as well as the other central disorders of hypersomnolence that include narcolepsy type 1 and 2 and Kleine-Levin syndrome.
  • We continue to grow our MAB – After our Denver conference we had two new physicians give a resounding “yes” to join Dr. Jason Ong and Dr. Michel Lecendreux. That brings the HF MAB to a total of eight medical healthcare professionals working in the field of hypersomnia.
  • The Hypersomnia Foundation was the recipient of a grant from the Trip Advisor Charitable Foundation to increase awareness of hypersomnia! We are most appreciative of these funds to update our website and enhance our social media presence.
  • The Hypersomnia Foundation has sought the input of a broad swath of the hypersomnia community in various ways, most notably through the launch of the PAAC: People with Hypersomnia and Advocates Advisory Council.  The PAAC was developed as a means to boost communication, gather input, and share ideas with those in the hypersomnia community. The group meets via phone once a month.

And finally…

  • The HF Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) is growing and creating a plan to raise awareness about hypersomnia among clinical and basic science researchers. One key component of this plan is a grants program that will financially support innovative research applications that are most likely to positively impact the hypersomnia community. Announcement of this program to the scientific community will depend upon having funds in hand sufficient to attract the best science as well as sustain this initiative. We have been building a research fund since our incorporation and continue to fundraise toward this effort.
  • SomnusNooze, our free electronic newsletter, continues — written and edited by volunteers, with all clinical/scientific information vetted by a member of the Medical Advisory Board (MAB). Delivered to over 1,445 inboxes, up 25% since the first of the year, on topics including clinical trial opportunity, summaries of scientific articles, drug and treatment updates, personal Journey Stories, coping tips, new doctor details, information on disability issues, use of service animals, and research opportunities. “Ask the Doctor” feature coming soon. Subscribe here: http://www.hypersomniafoundation.org/hypersomnia-news/somnusnooze/

As we prepare for 2017 we are excited for new opportunities to raise awareness, education and research about idiopathic hypersomnia and related disorders. We appreciate the support, feedback and great ideas from the entire hypersomnia community!

Posted in: SomnusNooze

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You Are Amazing!

 
Once again, our incredible hypersomnia family has come together to support each other in a most amazing way. As you know, several anonymous donors challenged our community to enroll in the Hypersomnia Foundation Registry at CoRDS during the month of September. You responded beyond anyone’s imagination—118 people enrolled, bringing the total number of enrollees to 350! Completing those questionnaires and the entire enrollment process wasn’t easy, but you persevered—and the results are tangible. Not only did you raise $5900 for research, but two researchers have already submitted grant applications to the US Food and Drug Administration and the National Institutes of Health with the intent of using data from the Registry in their research. Having this incredible resource available gives scientists a leg up in applying for funding.

Although the challenge has come to an end, it is not too late to add your piece to the hypersomnia puzzle. The more people who participate, the more likely it is that scientists will be able to complete the puzzle and find effective treatments and a more thorough understanding of the cause of IH. Go to hypersomniafoundation.org/registry for more information.


Have You Joined the Registry Yet?

A patient registry is a collection that is established to collect standardized information about a group of patients who share a common condition or experience. In the case of the Hypersomnia Foundation Registry at CoRDS (Coordination of Rare Diseases at Sanford), the people who participate have one of the central disorders of hypersomnolence: idiopathic hypersomnia, Kleine-Levin syndrome, or narcolepsy (type 1 or 2). Becoming part of the registry is easy and it could help solve the puzzle of hypersomnia! Simply go to http://www.sanfordresearch.org/cords/ and click on the ENROLL NOW button.

A patient registry is a collection that is established to collect standardized information about a group of patients who share a common condition or experience. In the case of the Hypersomnia Foundation Registry at CoRDS (Coordination of Rare Diseases at Sanford), the people who participate have one of the central disorders of hypersomnolence: idiopathic hypersomnia, Kleine-Levin syndrome, or narcolepsy (type 1 or 2). Becoming part of the registry is easy and it could help solve the puzzle of hypersomnia! Simply go to http://www.sanfordresearch.org/cords/ and click on the ENROLL NOW button.

Posted in: CoRDS Registry, SomnusNooze

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Act Today and Let Your Voice Be Heard

Very recently, the Hypersomnia Foundation became aware of an opportunity to help shape the future of sleep research. The National Institutes of Health, the primary source of funding for medical research in the United States, has issued a Request for Information, which you can view at: https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-HL-16-312.html.

The final date to submit your comments has been extended to today, May 16, 2016.Screen Shot 2016-05-16 at 12.41.44 PM

Last week, we sent an email to everyone in our database to encourage you to make your voices heard. We are urging you again to act today. Please share your hypersomnia story with the people who determine medical research priorities and allocate funds.

  • Tell them why the currently available diagnostic tools and lack of awareness about hypersomnia led to a lengthy delay in your diagnosis.
  • Tell them why research into the cause of and effective treatments for hypersomnia are so desperately needed.
  • Tell them why we need a cure as soon as possible because hypersomnia is limiting your ability to achieve your dreams, complete your education, or even provide financially for your family.

Please join your voice with ours as we fight to secure the place of hypersomnia at the top of the nation’s sleep research agenda. The Hypersomnia Foundation Board of Directors has submitted the following response, and we encourage you to send your comments and suggestions to the NIH, as you deem appropriate, at rfi-sleepplan2016@collaboration.nhlbi.nih.gov.


 

Hypersomnia Foundation Response
to the National Institutes of Health’s Request for Information:

For nearly a century, the study of sleep and its function(s) in health and disease has been principally focused within approaches that center on not enough sleep. Although excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), cognitive dissonance, and other symptoms not surprisingly result from sleep deprivation, central disorders of hypersomnolence (CDH; e.g., idiopathic hypersomnia, Kleine-Levin syndrome,
narcolepsy type 1 [NT1], and narcolepsy type 2 [NT2]) in humans (in which EDS is often accompanied by extremes of sleep length) emerge spontaneously. Studying patients with CDH has already proven to be fertile ground for investigation, as evidenced by the discovery that loss of brain hypocretin causes narcolepsy with
cataplexy (i.e., NT1). Yet, for the other CDH, there remains a large unmet clinical need, with further research and development prime for discovery and the potential for extraordinary translational opportunities.

Symptoms of CDH can be disabling, and because, for example in NT1, they also begin in adolescence or young adulthood, are chronic, sometimes progressive, go undiagnosed or misdiagnosed for decades, and respond variably to medications.
Despite advances around NT1, the knowledge gained has not translated smoothly to
the clinical realm. Diagnoses of CDH inclusive of NT1 since 1975 have relied upon a
forty-year-old test (viz., the Multiple Sleep Latency Test [MSLT]) that is cost, time,
and labor intensive and that was born of practical necessity and subsequently
tweaked to specifically identify NT1. In 2006, two preeminent sleep researchers concluded that the MSLT yields “a large number of false-positives” and that an increased daytime propensity to REM-sleep—traditionally accepted to be the sole domain of NT1—does “not appear to have any specific pathognomonic significance.” Yet, in 2016, the MSLT remains the gold standard that drives diagnoses and all that it implies. For clinician scientists, this means, for example, how clinical trials are designed and studies of heritability are conducted. Even more so, for patients, this has enormous implications for prognosis, treatment choice, access to medication(s), and accommodations/disability status.

There are currently no FDA-approved treatments for the CDH—medication choice being limited to those for narcolepsy. Since the 1930s, conventional
psychostimulants such as ephedrine have been used to treat NT1. The majority of the current pharmacological armamentarium and drug development are similarly designed and focused upon promoting wakefulness by enhancing brain monoamines. Drugs more directly designed to replace hypocretin continue in development 16 years after the discovery of hypocretin. An alternative construct in approaching the biology and treatment of CDH has recently been proposed that appears to hold great promise for many patients. People with CDH without NT1 (i.e., hypocretin being intact) do not appear to suffer from any “loss of function” per se but, rather, a gain of function in sleep-promoting brain circuits. Thus, pharmacologic agents that antagonize the sleep-promoting and consciousness-dampening neurotransmitter gammaaminobutyric acid (GABA), such as flumazenil, clarithromycin, and pentylenetetrazol, have either been demonstrated to be effective or are in clinical trials for CDH patients in whom traditional wake-promoting agents have not been helpful.

We advocate for initiatives to fund discovery research that translates to improve the human condition of people with CDH in whom sleep is prolonged and ostensibly persists into “wake.” Enhanced recognition and improved treatments call for greater understanding of not only the clinical spectrum of CDH and the natural history of these disorders, but also mechanistic understanding of their biological underpinnings. Diagnostic tools that are highly discriminative and designed to capture more than just EDS and an increased daytime propensity to REM sleep are an absolute necessity. CDH remain diagnoses of exclusion such that greater understanding of potential mimics—which themselves would enhance mechanistic understanding of sleep—and biomarker discovery are also high priorities. As there are numerous stakeholders in such endeavors, as evidenced in the summary provided above, the absolute need to encourage greater dialogue and collaboration among patients, patient advocacy groups, professional organizations representing sleep physicians, funding agencies, and industry cannot be understated. With increasing dissemination of knowledge through many means, not the least of which includes social media, patient consumers with CDH-like symptoms have become increasingly knowledgeable. They are acutely aware that CDH outside the realm of NT1 is not well served by current medical knowledge or practice in this realm. Accepting the status quo risks alienating the public and medical consumer.

We would, therefore, propose including a sleep neurobiologist on the NHLBI Sleep
Disorders Research Advisory Board and developing mechanisms for solicitation of
program projects and set-aside funds specifically to research hypersomnia, with requests for proposals to prioritize filling unmet clinical needs in the following areas:

R37 Javits Neuroscience Investigator Award
NIH EUREKA grants
R13 funding to support conferences
T32 grants for postdoctoral study
RFAs and more specifically RFPs
SBRI funding for better diagnostic tools

Because the breadth of scientific inquiry or line of investigation needs incredible resources and sustainability, we would advocate for funding initiatives with set-aside monies at all levels of training, including predoctoral, doctoral, postdoctoral, junior investigator, and senior investigators, and we envision promoting set-aside monies for all the Career Development K Awards for investigators with projects relevant to CDH.


 

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Learn about the latest hypersomnia research on June 12th at the Hypersomnia Foundation’s regional conference, Beyond Sleepy in the Mile High City. Scientists will share findings from their recently completed clinical trials and other ongoing studies, lead us on a journey through the drug discovery and approval process, and help us to cope with the daily struggles of hypersomnia. You will also learn how your future participation in the registry can help to solve the puzzle of hypersomnia.

Tickets are running out so order your $25 ticket online to join us in person in Denver or wait until June 1 to sign up for a live Internet stream of the conference, brought to you free of charge through the generous support of Balance Therapeutics, Inc., and Flamel Technologies, SA.

 

 

 

Posted in: Action, Awareness, Education, Hypersomnia, idiopathic hypersomna, Kleine-Levin syndrome, narcolepsy, News, Research, SomnusNooze

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