Hypersomnia Foundation

Midyear Recap

Can you believe that 2016 is almost half over? It’s been a very busy year at the Hypersomnia calendarFoundation, where volunteers have been hard at work establishing new programs and bringing you the latest information on the central disorders of
hypersomnolence—primarily idiopathic hypersomnia, but also narcolepsy and Kleine-Levin syndrome. In case you’ve missed anything, here is a brief summary.

  •  Attendance at Beyond Sleepy in the Mile High City far exceeded our expectations—we anticipated 50 people, planned for 75, and hosted 81 in Denver! Keeping our fingers crossed that the Livestream version would be well received, we hoped for 500 to 750 people to tune in. Wow, more than 1100 people viewed the program live, with an additional 235 having watched the recording in the past week. Not surprisingly, slightly more than 70% of people watched from the US. However, folks from Australia, Norway, France, the UK, and seven other countries also participated. Thanks to a volunteer, we were able to take questions from anyone who had a twitter account, and most of the questions were answered during the Q&A session, which was ultimately included in the Livestream broadcast. If you missed the program, please sign up at http://www.hypersomniafoundation.org/2016-hypersomnia-regional-conference-register/ and watch as many times as you like or invite your family and friends to participate.
  • You are reading our 100th issue of SomnusNooze, the Foundation’s weekly free Celebrating_100_issueelectronic newsletter. Today, it landed in 1282 inboxes, which is up by more than 25% since the first of the year. If you have friends, colleagues, classmates, teachers or family members who would benefit from learning about the latest research regarding hypersomnia or understanding from reading what it is like to live with hypersomnia, encourage them to subscribe to SomnusNooze at http://www.hypersomniafoundation.org/
  • We will be implementing a new feature in SomnusNooze called Ask the Doctor. Members of the Medical Advisory Board have graciously offered to answer your general questions about central disorders of hypersomnolence. Of course, they won’t be able to answer specific questions regarding individual treatments or conditions. Please send your questions to AskTheDoctor@hypersomniafoundation.org
  • After years of endless revisions and input from researchers, physicians, people with various forms of central disorders or hypersomnolence, and CoRDS personnel, we have launched the Hypersomnia Foundation Registry at CoRDS. This registry will form the backbone of many future research projects to be conducted by scientists from throughout the world. Your participation in the registry will garner new insights into the disease processes and help scientists better understand the differences among the various hypersomnia disorders. Please sign up today at http://www.sanfordresearch.org/cords/ to help solve the puzzle of hypersomnia. For more information, please visit the June 14, 2016, issue of SomnusNooze.
  • This month, the Hypersomnia Foundation was the recipient of a grant from the Trip Advisor Charitable Foundation to increase awareness of hypersomnia. We are most appreciative of these funds, which will allow us to update our website and enhance our social media presence. 
  • The Hypersomnia Foundation has sought the input of a broad swath of the hypersomnia community in various ways over the past six months. With the launch of the PAAC, the People with Hypersomnia and Advocates Advisory Council, we have developed a means to boost communication with our constituents. In addition, last month’s survey, to which 192 people responded, is the first of what will be many surveys to elicit your input. You gave us a clear mandate that research and increasing awareness among the public and physicians are your priorities for the coming the year.

Not only do the members of the Board of Directors work tirelessly on your behalf, but they also all make the Hypersomnia Foundation a priority in their charitable giving. However, we can’t do it alone. Although we understand that not everyone has the means to simply write a check or transfer an appreciated stock, the continued success of the Hypersomnia Foundation is dependent upon your financial support. We offer you here several additional creative ways to support our continued efforts to meet these challenges you have set ourt for us.

Company Matching Gifts – Several donors have employers who match their gifts to the Hypersomnia Foundation – even a small donation makes a big difference when you double the opportunity to support people with hypersomnia!

Recurring donations through credit card or PayPal – A small monthly gift certainly adds up over time and is easy when you set it up to occur automatically. You don’t have to remember to make that payment, but what you can remember is the impact you will have on the hypersomnia community through your support.

Employee-Advised Grants – We received the grant from the Trip Advisor Charitable Foundation when a dedicated Hypersomnia Foundation volunteer nominated us late last year for her company’s giving program. We were invited to submit a proposal and make a presentation, which resulted in the aforementioned funds to increase awareness of hypersomnia among the general public and physicians. Perhaps your company has a similar program and a simple inquiry can make a world of difference

Friends and family helping friends and family – Many of the donations that we receive are in honor of someone who has hypersomnia. Talk about spreading the love!

AmazonSmile – Do you shop ANYTHING Amazon? If you designate the Hypersomnia Foundation as your charity of choice at amazon.smile.com, Amazon will donate a percentage of your eligible purchases to the Hypersomnia Foundation at absolutely no cost to you. Last year we were received several hundred dollars from AmazonSmile. Every bit counts!

Bravelets – A supporter set up a shop through Bravelets, where $10 from each item purchased is being donated to the Hypersomnia Foundation. When she set up the campaign, the supporter sent us this note, “Welcome! I came across this wonderful website a couple weeks ago. There are so many great fundraisers already started, but I noticed there was not one for hypersomnia yet! As someone who was diagnosed with hypersomnia, I know how hard it can be to be brave in the face of this frustrating and sometimes confusing illness. Please join me in spreading the word and helping the Hypersomnia Foundation.” https://www.bravelets.com/bravepage/hypersomnia-awareness-bravelets

Do you have a creative way of giving to the Hypersomnia Foundation? Please let us know, and we will gladly share it with others in an upcoming edition of SomnusNooze.

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Solving the Puzzle of Hypersomnia One Piece at a Time

The Hypersomnia Foundation Board of Directors is thrilled to announce the launch of the Hypersomnia Foundation’s Registry at CoRDS (Coordination of Rare Diseases at Sanford). Whether you have idiopathic hypersomnia, Kleine-Levin syndrome or narcolepsy type 1 or 2, please enroll in the Registry today to help solve the puzzle of hypersomnia. Your information will help researchers comprehend the journey that people with hypersomnia travel in their search for a diagnosis and will answer many other questions, including the symptoms that you experience, which may help to distinguish among these disorders, and the treatments that have and have not worked for your symptoms. Registration is simple (the second figure below describes the process). Simply go to http://www.sanfordresearch.org/cords/ and click on the ENROLL NOW button. Your answers to the Registry questions will help researchers design better diagnostic tools and more effective treatments and, eventually, find a cure. CoRDS personnel are available to help you, if needed, during the registration process. They can be reached at cords@sanfordhealth.org or 1 (877) 658-9192.

 

What is a Registry? A patient registry is a collection that is established to collect standardized information about a group of patients who share a common condition or experience. In the case of the Hypersomnia Foundation Registry at CoRDS, the people who participate have one of the central disorders of hypersomnolence: idiopathic hypersomnia, Kleine-Levin syndrome, or narcolepsy (type 1 or 2).

What is a Registry?
A patient registry is a collection that is established to collect standardized information about a group of patients who share a common condition or experience. In the case of the Hypersomnia Foundation Registry at CoRDS, the people who participate have one of the central disorders of hypersomnolence: idiopathic hypersomnia, Kleine-Levin syndrome, or narcolepsy (type 1 or 2).

cords process

CoRDS Registration Process

 

Posted in: Action, Awareness, BeyondSleepy, CoRDS Registry, Education, Hypersomnia, idiopathic hypersomna, Kleine-Levin syndrome, narcolepsy, SomnusNooze

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NEWSFLASH!

With seating beyond planned capacity at the conference in Denver and to make the #BeyondSleepy conference more accessible, we will be streaming the entirety of the conference, including the question-and-answer portion. Thanks to a tech-savvy volunteer,Strike we will not only be livetweeting the conference from our Twitter account (@HypersomniaNews), but will also be able to accept your relevant questions. So tweet your questions using the hashtag #AskBeyondSleepy.

Please don’t wait until the last minute to register! Our website is a bit crotchety and slow, so if everyone tries registers at once immediately before the conference, you may miss part of the program!

We look forward to your participation in the conference!

Posted in: BeyondSleepy, Conference, Hypersomnia, idiopathic hypersomna, Kleine-Levin syndrome, narcolepsy, News, Social Media, SomnusNooze

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Five More Days!

Only five more days until the 2016 Hypersomnia Foundation Regional Conference!!!

Are you joining us in Denver or tuning into the live Internet broadcast? Either way, we understand that you might have a few last-minute questions, so we’ve put together a list of recently asked questions.

1. My schedule just changed, and I’ll be able to make it to Denver after all. Can I still buy a ticket?

Yes, you can, but we have only a few tickets left (At the time of publication, we had 4 tickets left). To purchase a ticket to attend Beyond Sleepy in the Mile-High City in person, please click on this link or purchase a ticket here http://2016hypersomniaconference.eventbrite.com/

2. I have purchased my ticket for Beyond Sleepy in the Mile-High City. I would like to get together with other people with hypersomnia. Where can I find them?

You’re in luck! We have created three separate opportunities to get together with other conference attendees. On Saturday evening, June 11, at 6 pm, we will gather in the Atrium Alcove on the fourth floor of the Embassy Suites Hotel, 1420 Stout Street. This informal gathering will include a cash bar, games, and camaraderie. On Saturday, we will be reserving tables so that we can all sit together for breakfast beginning at 7:30 am in the Embassy Suites Hotel (breakfast is not included). Head to the meeting room (Crestone) on the third floor of the Embassy Suites Hotel beginning at 10 am, where, once you have completed the sign-in process, you can just sit and chat or make plans with others gathered there to go out for lunch before the conference begins at noon.

3. What time will Beyond Sleepy in the Mile-High City get underway?

We will be starting promptly at noon, Mountain Daylight Time. People from around the world will be tuning in, so please calculate your viewing time based on GMT-6.

4. Will we have any food?

Well, this answer depends on how you are participating. We will be serving light refreshments at 2:00 pm at the Embassy Suites Hotel in Denver, underwritten in part by a grant from Pavilion Pharmacy. If you are watching via the Internet, you are on your own for snacks.

5. I am coming to the conference in Denver, but I know that I will have trouble remembering everything that the speakers are saying. Can I watch the Internet streaming later to refresh my memory?

YES!!! You can buy a ticket for the Denver conference and register on the Hypersomnia Foundation’s website to watch the streaming video. Once you have registered for the streaming video, you will be able to view the event as many times as you would like between June 13 and July 11, 2016. We are also working on creating a permanent link to the videos, but we don’t want to make any promises at this point.

6. I live in Australia. The Hypersomnia Foundation Conference, Beyond Sleepy in the Mile-High City, will be live at 4 am in my timezone. Are there any other options to watch?

YES!! Take a look at the response to the previous message.  Please complete the registration on the Hypersomnia Foundation’s website (http://www.hypersomniafoundation.org/register/) and you will be able to view Beyond Sleepy in the Mile-High City as many times as you would like between June 13, and July 11, 2016.

7. My sister would like to watch the Beyond Sleepy in the Mile-High City, but she is not on the Hypersomnia Foundation’s mailing list. Can she still watch the program?

YES!! She is more than welcome to join us. The purpose of this program is to educate anyone who would like to learn more about hypersomnia. From teachers and professors to employers, parents and friends, spouses, and children, doctors and pharmacists, the program will help people understand the full impact of hypersomnia on the lives of those affected. Registration is open to anyone with a streaming device and an Internet connection. Please widely share this link (http://www.hypersomniafoundation.org/register/) to the registration page and encourage as many people as possible to take part.

We hope this answered any questions you may have had and we look forward to your attendance at the conference! Please direct any additional questions you may have to conference@hypersomniafoundation.org

Posted in: Awareness, BeyondSleepy, Conference, Education, Hypersomnia, idiopathic hypersomna, Kleine-Levin syndrome, narcolepsy, SomnusNooze

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Mark Your Calendar, Set Your Alarm, and Register Today

June 12, 2016, is the date. Noon Mountain Daylight Time (MDT) is the time. And, as promised, registration for the alarmLivestream feed of Beyond Sleepy in the Mile High City: a Hypersomnia Foundation Regional Conference is now  open. Thanks to the generous support of our sponsors—Balance Therapeutics, Inc., and Flamel Technologies, SA—you, your family, friends, classmates, teachers, coworkers, and anyone else you would like to invite can attend this broadcast of the event free of charge. However, you will have to provide your own refreshments during the 2:00 break.

This unique program is an opportunity for you to hear the latest research about idiopathic hypersomnia (IH), learn behavioral techniques to live better with IH, and find out how you can help to advance the science and treatment of IH by participating in research studies and the Hypersomnia Foundation registry. Have you ever had difficulty explaining IH to your friends or family members? Do your coworkers and the HR department struggle with understanding why you might need an accommodation to come in a little later or to work a flexible schedule? If so, we encourage all of the important people in your life to join you in watching, or invite them to tune in from wherever they might be to, Beyond Sleepy in the Mile High City: a Hypersomnia Foundation Regional Conference.

Registration is simple.

Anytime before noon MDT on June 12, 2016, you can register for the Livestream feed. It is recommended that you complete registration using the device that you will be using to watch Beyond Sleepy on the 12th.

Please follow these steps to register:

  1. Click on this link, or go to http://www.hypersomniafoundation.org/register/ and complete the entire registration.
  2. Select and enter a username.
  3. Enter an active email address of an account that you check frequently.online registration
  4. Select and enter a password that is a combination of at least seven letters or numbers.
  5. Enter your first and last names.
  6. Click Register.
  7. You will be redirected to a confirmation page.
  8. That’s it; you are registered!
  9. You will receive an email message containing the account information you will need if you have to manually log into the Livestream feed of the conference on the 12th. If you do not receive this email message, please check your spam or junk mail folder.

On June 12th, simply go to http://www.hypersomniafoundation.org/login. If you are using the same device with which you completed the registration process, you should be automatically logged in and redirected to the Beyond Sleepy in the Mile High City Livestream feed. However, depending on your computer settings, you may be required to log into the system manually. To do so, enter the username and password you provided during registration if prompted to do so on this login page. 


 A very few tickets are available for the in-person Beyond Sleepy in the Mile High City: a Hypersomnia Foundation Regional Conference on June 12, 2016, in Denver, CO. For more information and to register, please visit http://www.hypersomniafoundation.org/2016-hypersomnia-regional-conference.

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Sleep Disorders and Your Job – What To Do When The Writing’s On The Wall

Social Security Disability Series: Part 1

Sleep Disorders and Your Job  – What To Do When The Writing’s On The Wall

By Anjel Burgess, JD

Jennie is a 40-year-old single mother of two children who has been working for 10 years as a data entry clerk. Jennie Jennie - disabilitywas diagnosed with idiopathic hypersomnia one year ago and has been working with her doctor to try and manage her progressively worsening symptoms. Over the last year, they have tried every medication conceivable, and her current medications have her optimal productivity time at about 3 hours. Jennie has been arriving to work late, struggling to stay awake at work, and sneaking breaks throughout the day to rest and is only able to be productive for about 3 hours throughout the day. Her supervisor has found her asleep at her desk on multiple occasions, and Jennie finds that her once impeccable work product is now riddled with errors. She was recently written up for performance-related concerns, which means that, at this point, the writing is on the wall. With a family to provide for and medical treatment that is vital to receive, Jennie is concerned that she will be fired. She has consulted with her employer, and has been told that she has the following options available to her:

  1. FMLA (Family Medical Leave Act) – This is unpaid job-protected leave of up to 12 weeks for employees who have a serious health condition that makes the employees unable to perform essential functions of their jobs.
  2. Short-term disability – These benefits are often made available by the employer, but private policies are also available. Short-term disability policies provide benefits after a short waiting period of 7 to 30 days, once the insurance company has documentation that employees are unable to perform their duties. Short-term disability programs typically pay 60% of the benefit salary and may be available for 3 months to a period of years.
  3. Long-term disability – These benefits may be available through the employer or a private policy. These policies typically provide benefits after a 180-day waiting period and typically pay 60% of an employee’s benefit salary. Long-term disability benefits may be available through full retirement age.

In Jennie’s case, her best option is to apply for short-term disability, with a plan to apply for long-term disability benefits once her short-term disability benefits are exhausted. Once she leaves work to begin her short-term disability benefits, Jennie should also apply for Social Security disability benefits.

Social Security disability – Jennie is eligible for Social Security disability benefits based on her work history. Through her employer, Jennie has been paying FICA taxes, which makes her eligible for financial assistance and health insurance through Social Security disability in the event that she becomes disabled and is unable to work for a year or more. Since the process for Social Security benefits typically takes two years to complete, it is in Jennie’s best interest to apply as soon as she stops working so that she can ensure that her financial support from short-term and long-term disability will carry her through while she waits for the process to be completed.

If you, too, are struggling to maintain your employment due to the symptoms flowing from idiopathic hypersomnia or any sleep disorder, don’t wait until the writing is on the wall for your termination. Secure your eligibility for short-term disability and long-term disability benefits today through your employer. Contact a qualified Social Security Disability Attorney to assist you with an application for benefits.  

Anjel Burgess is a partner/attorney at the Law Firm of Burgess and Christensen located in Marietta, GA. She exclusively practices Social Security Disability Law for adults and children, as well as the ancillary areas of Guardianships and Special Needs Trusts. By doing so, she has been able to make a positive difference in the daily lives of people who need help the most. You may reach her at Anjel@DisabilityHelpLine.com or 770-422-8111. You can learn more about her services at www.DisabilityHelpLine.com.

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Act Today and Let Your Voice Be Heard

Very recently, the Hypersomnia Foundation became aware of an opportunity to help shape the future of sleep research. The National Institutes of Health, the primary source of funding for medical research in the United States, has issued a Request for Information, which you can view at: https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-HL-16-312.html.

The final date to submit your comments has been extended to today, May 16, 2016.Screen Shot 2016-05-16 at 12.41.44 PM

Last week, we sent an email to everyone in our database to encourage you to make your voices heard. We are urging you again to act today. Please share your hypersomnia story with the people who determine medical research priorities and allocate funds.

  • Tell them why the currently available diagnostic tools and lack of awareness about hypersomnia led to a lengthy delay in your diagnosis.
  • Tell them why research into the cause of and effective treatments for hypersomnia are so desperately needed.
  • Tell them why we need a cure as soon as possible because hypersomnia is limiting your ability to achieve your dreams, complete your education, or even provide financially for your family.

Please join your voice with ours as we fight to secure the place of hypersomnia at the top of the nation’s sleep research agenda. The Hypersomnia Foundation Board of Directors has submitted the following response, and we encourage you to send your comments and suggestions to the NIH, as you deem appropriate, at rfi-sleepplan2016@collaboration.nhlbi.nih.gov.


 

Hypersomnia Foundation Response
to the National Institutes of Health’s Request for Information:

For nearly a century, the study of sleep and its function(s) in health and disease has been principally focused within approaches that center on not enough sleep. Although excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), cognitive dissonance, and other symptoms not surprisingly result from sleep deprivation, central disorders of hypersomnolence (CDH; e.g., idiopathic hypersomnia, Kleine-Levin syndrome,
narcolepsy type 1 [NT1], and narcolepsy type 2 [NT2]) in humans (in which EDS is often accompanied by extremes of sleep length) emerge spontaneously. Studying patients with CDH has already proven to be fertile ground for investigation, as evidenced by the discovery that loss of brain hypocretin causes narcolepsy with
cataplexy (i.e., NT1). Yet, for the other CDH, there remains a large unmet clinical need, with further research and development prime for discovery and the potential for extraordinary translational opportunities.

Symptoms of CDH can be disabling, and because, for example in NT1, they also begin in adolescence or young adulthood, are chronic, sometimes progressive, go undiagnosed or misdiagnosed for decades, and respond variably to medications.
Despite advances around NT1, the knowledge gained has not translated smoothly to
the clinical realm. Diagnoses of CDH inclusive of NT1 since 1975 have relied upon a
forty-year-old test (viz., the Multiple Sleep Latency Test [MSLT]) that is cost, time,
and labor intensive and that was born of practical necessity and subsequently
tweaked to specifically identify NT1. In 2006, two preeminent sleep researchers concluded that the MSLT yields “a large number of false-positives” and that an increased daytime propensity to REM-sleep—traditionally accepted to be the sole domain of NT1—does “not appear to have any specific pathognomonic significance.” Yet, in 2016, the MSLT remains the gold standard that drives diagnoses and all that it implies. For clinician scientists, this means, for example, how clinical trials are designed and studies of heritability are conducted. Even more so, for patients, this has enormous implications for prognosis, treatment choice, access to medication(s), and accommodations/disability status.

There are currently no FDA-approved treatments for the CDH—medication choice being limited to those for narcolepsy. Since the 1930s, conventional
psychostimulants such as ephedrine have been used to treat NT1. The majority of the current pharmacological armamentarium and drug development are similarly designed and focused upon promoting wakefulness by enhancing brain monoamines. Drugs more directly designed to replace hypocretin continue in development 16 years after the discovery of hypocretin. An alternative construct in approaching the biology and treatment of CDH has recently been proposed that appears to hold great promise for many patients. People with CDH without NT1 (i.e., hypocretin being intact) do not appear to suffer from any “loss of function” per se but, rather, a gain of function in sleep-promoting brain circuits. Thus, pharmacologic agents that antagonize the sleep-promoting and consciousness-dampening neurotransmitter gammaaminobutyric acid (GABA), such as flumazenil, clarithromycin, and pentylenetetrazol, have either been demonstrated to be effective or are in clinical trials for CDH patients in whom traditional wake-promoting agents have not been helpful.

We advocate for initiatives to fund discovery research that translates to improve the human condition of people with CDH in whom sleep is prolonged and ostensibly persists into “wake.” Enhanced recognition and improved treatments call for greater understanding of not only the clinical spectrum of CDH and the natural history of these disorders, but also mechanistic understanding of their biological underpinnings. Diagnostic tools that are highly discriminative and designed to capture more than just EDS and an increased daytime propensity to REM sleep are an absolute necessity. CDH remain diagnoses of exclusion such that greater understanding of potential mimics—which themselves would enhance mechanistic understanding of sleep—and biomarker discovery are also high priorities. As there are numerous stakeholders in such endeavors, as evidenced in the summary provided above, the absolute need to encourage greater dialogue and collaboration among patients, patient advocacy groups, professional organizations representing sleep physicians, funding agencies, and industry cannot be understated. With increasing dissemination of knowledge through many means, not the least of which includes social media, patient consumers with CDH-like symptoms have become increasingly knowledgeable. They are acutely aware that CDH outside the realm of NT1 is not well served by current medical knowledge or practice in this realm. Accepting the status quo risks alienating the public and medical consumer.

We would, therefore, propose including a sleep neurobiologist on the NHLBI Sleep
Disorders Research Advisory Board and developing mechanisms for solicitation of
program projects and set-aside funds specifically to research hypersomnia, with requests for proposals to prioritize filling unmet clinical needs in the following areas:

R37 Javits Neuroscience Investigator Award
NIH EUREKA grants
R13 funding to support conferences
T32 grants for postdoctoral study
RFAs and more specifically RFPs
SBRI funding for better diagnostic tools

Because the breadth of scientific inquiry or line of investigation needs incredible resources and sustainability, we would advocate for funding initiatives with set-aside monies at all levels of training, including predoctoral, doctoral, postdoctoral, junior investigator, and senior investigators, and we envision promoting set-aside monies for all the Career Development K Awards for investigators with projects relevant to CDH.


 

SN-Image

Learn about the latest hypersomnia research on June 12th at the Hypersomnia Foundation’s regional conference, Beyond Sleepy in the Mile High City. Scientists will share findings from their recently completed clinical trials and other ongoing studies, lead us on a journey through the drug discovery and approval process, and help us to cope with the daily struggles of hypersomnia. You will also learn how your future participation in the registry can help to solve the puzzle of hypersomnia.

Tickets are running out so order your $25 ticket online to join us in person in Denver or wait until June 1 to sign up for a live Internet stream of the conference, brought to you free of charge through the generous support of Balance Therapeutics, Inc., and Flamel Technologies, SA.

 

 

 

Posted in: Action, Awareness, Education, Hypersomnia, idiopathic hypersomna, Kleine-Levin syndrome, narcolepsy, News, Research, SomnusNooze

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Her

All I can say is my admiration for those that suffer with idiopathic hypersomnia (IH) is truly immense. I love an IH sufferer, and even though she fights every day just to participate and contribute, she still shares humor and kisses like smuggled chocolate drops in a dreary math’s lesson.

sleeping woman Some days you can see the drugs are in slow mo, and all you want to do is wrap your arms around her and pump her up with the normalcy of simply feeling awake. Every tomorrow brings fresh hope she will make it all the way to the end without a crippling migraine, or be slam dunked by a drooling sleep fest, stealing away her hard-earned achievements … Or worse still… a cruel and soul-destroying comment from an ignorant and narrow-minded baboon stewing in his ungrateful and wasted soup of well-being. Stupidly, he mistakes her for lazy, slow, or disconnected, having no idea that he has just had an encounter with a rare warrior—one who wins and conquers life one precious moment at a time in a world where whole years are abandoned and forgotten. She, so young, has learnt how to manage a bigger load, invisible to the untrained eye, with finite stamina, measuring routine activities carefully with brave grit and frowned-faced fortitude.

Yet, as I watch her slow drunkard-like stance, slowly mobilizing each muscle to reach vertical every morning, I no longer feel that dark despair and loss. I am now infused with hope, amused and bewildered by how love curled by pain for so long can march you back up a cranky forgiving road to welcome in our new norm. Two adult women, cradling acceptance and insistence, seesawing between the two, me and her, mother and daughter.

Anonymous Supporter

Posted in: Awareness, BeyondSleepy, Hypersomnia, idiopathic hypersomna, SomnusNooze, Uncategorized

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Sleep-Wake Disturbance Following a Traumatic Brain Injury

Background

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 2 million people in the United States suffer a traumatic brain injury (TBI) every year. Most people with a TBI will also experience a sleep-wake disturbance (a real or perceived change in night-time sleep with resulting daytime impairment, SWD).

Over the past 10 years, a group of scientists in Switzerland has been focusing their research on SWD after TBI. In 2015, Dr. Imbach and his colleagues published their results of a study in which they examined the sleep of 60 patients 6 months after the patients had experienced a TBI. They found that the presence of bleeding in the brain at the time of injury was the greatest risk factor for developing a SWD. A new study followed those same patients for another 12 months (18 months total), and we report the results of that study here.

Who were the participants in the study and what did they do?

brain_xray158w210hThe 60 participants in this study were selected from among 140 adults who had experienced a first-ever TBI. They each underwent a computerized tomographic (CT) scan within 4 hours after the TBI and detailed assessment with standard clinical metrics (e.g., the Glasgow Coma Scale, which is a rough measure of the severity of the brain injury). The participants were matched with 42 people who did not have a TBI but who were of similar age, sex, and sleepiness (control group). Eleven people in the control group dropped out of the study, leaving 31 with complete data from all testing.

The average age of participants was 33 in the TBI group and 36 in the control group. Eleven participants in each group were men.

All participants wore an actigraph for two weeks on two separate occasions: for those with a TBI, six months after having the TBI and then again 18 months after the TBI. (An actigraph, which looks like an oversized watch, is typically worn on the nondominant wrist [that is, if you are right-handed, you would wear it on your left wrist]. It contains an accelerometer and records movements. Once the testing period is complete, the data are downloaded from the device and analyzed off line.)

Participants also reported their subjective perceptions of sleepiness and daytime fatigue by way of Epworth Sleepiness (ESS) and Fatigue Severity (FSS) Scales at these same intervals.

Who were the researchers and what did they do?

Dr. Lukas Imbach and his colleagues in Zurich and Bern, Switzerland, conducted a number of objective measures of sleep in all of the participants in both groups. In the TBI group, this testing took place six months after the TBI and, again, 18 months later.

They performed overnight sleep tests (polysomnography), commencing at 23:00 and terminating at 07:00, before then assessing for participants’ increased propensity to daytime sleepiness by way of daytime nap studies (i.e., the Multiple Sleep Latency Test or MSLT). They compared the findings from the actigraphs, polysomnograms, and MSLTs and the FSS and ESS scores between the two groups, and among the TBI patients at two different time points following their head injuries.

What were the results of the study?

When measured over 24 hours with actigraphy, night-time sleep, but not daytime sleep, was longer in the TBI group (8.1 hours) as compared with the control group (7.1 hours).

Delta power, sleep fragmentation, and distribution of sleep stages on the polysomnogram were normal in the TBI group. Sleep latencies on the MSLT were shorter in the TBI group (an average of 7 minutes) as compared with the control group (11 minutes). Based on the MSLTs (objective measure), excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) was present in 67% of people with a TBI and 19% of control subjects. These levels of EDS remained fairly constant in the TBI group when comparing results at six and 18 months after the injury.

When comparing the objective and subjective measures of EDS (that is, MSLT vs ESS and FSS), the researchers identified a mismatch, “indicating persistent misperception of sleep-wake disturbance” in the group with TBI.

The presence of bleeding in the brain with the TBI and more severe TBI (lower Glasgow Coma Scale scores) predicted objective metrics of increased sleep quantities at night only during the major sleep period and EDS at 6 months after the TBI. Although findings at 18 months following the TBI emphasize the chronic nature of the negative impact of TBI upon SWD, the 6-month association between bleeding in the brain with the TBI and initial clinical severity of the injury was inexplicably no longer evident at 18 months following TBI.

What were the authors’ conclusions?

“We now provide long-term, prospective, controlled, and electrophysiologic evidence that sleepiness and [increased sleep need] remain a significant problem not only in the first months after TBI, but also in the long run.”

Imbach LL, Buechele F, Balko PO, Li T, Maric A, Stover JF, Bassetti CL, Mica L, Werth E, Baumann C. Sleep-wake disorders persist 18 months after traumatic brain injury but remain underrecognized. Neurology. 2016 ePub ahead of print.

An accompanying editorial to this paper concludes that, “Imbach et al. make a compelling case that posttraumatic sleep-wake disorders may represent a silent epidemic. With epidemiologic studies showing rising rates of TBI in civilian and military populations over the last decade, and with Imbach et al. now showing that the majority of patients with TBI have objective evidence of sleep-wake disturbance, the authors of future clinical guidelines will need to consider the emerging evidence supporting sleep studies in the care of patients with TBI.”

Edlow BL, Lammers GJ. Bringing posttraumatic sleep-wake disorders out of the dark. Neurology. 2016 ePub ahead of print.

Editor’s comments

It is important to realize that, although the MSLT results showed a shortened sleep latency in the participants with TBI, as compared with those without TBI, actigraphy identified no differences between the two groups with regard to amount of time spent sleeping during the daytime.

Note also that the overnight sleep studies were terminated at 0700, resulting in a maximum potential sleep time at night of 8 hours. Thus, while 67% of participants with TBI had a mean sleep latency of less than 8 minutes on the MSLT and would therefore meet International Classification of Sleep Disorders-3rd edition (ICSD-3) criteria for idiopathic hypersomnia, how many may have qualified for a diagnosis based on an overall sleep length exceeding 11 hours is not clear based on how the testing was conducted. It remains to be determined whether TBI, no matter how severe initially, might contribute to hypersomnia otherwise presumed to be “idiopathic,” and, if eventually deemed to meet ICSD-3 criteria for idiopathic hypersomnia, what the implications might be for prognosis and treatment.

This article was written by a volunteer medical writer and reviewed by David Rye, MD, PhD.

 

Posted in: BeyondSleepy, Hypersomnia, idiopathic hypersomna, Research, SomnusNooze

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Conference Details – Beyond Sleepy in the Mile High City!

Conference rectangle ImageIf you haven’t made your plans yet to attend the Hypersomnia Foundation’s regional conference in Denver—Beyond Sleepy in the Mile High City—you might want to do so today. Tickets are selling fast and seating is limited. The big event is in less than seven weeks! A registration link and additional information are available on the Hypersomnia Foundation website, or you can click on the ticket image below to go straight to the registration site. 

Wondering whether it’s going to be worth the trip to Denver? Well, wonder no longer. Whether you’re flying across country or driving down the mountain, this meeting offers plenty of time to network and socialize in addition to hearing some fantastic speakers. Remember, attending in person is the only way for you to participate in the question-and-answer session with the experts.

tickets 

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

 Saturday evening, June 11, from 6:00 to 10:00 pm—Join us in the Atrium Alcove on the talkingfourth floor of the Embassy Suites Hotel 1420 Stout Street, Denver, CO. Catch up with old friends and meet new people as we play board and card games or just spend some time in conversation.

Sunday morning, June 12, from 7:30 to 10:30 am—Join us for a hot made-to-order breakfast at the Embassy Suites Hotel and grab a spot at one of the tables we will have reserved. Don’t worry if you’re not up at 7:30; we’ll save you a place to join us later. (Breakfast is free if you are a guest at the Embassy Suites Hotel and $20 if you are not).

Sunday morning from 10:00 am to noon—Join us to pick up your name badge at registration on the third floor in the Crestone foyer at the Embassy Suites Hotel. Didn’t have enough time to socialize on Saturday evening? We will have a designated gathering space available during this time. Be sure to eat before coming to the conference. We will not be serving lunch.

Sunday afternoon from noon to 5 pm—Join us in the Crestone Salon B meeting room on the third floor of the Embassy Suites to hear six scientific presentations covering the latest on hypersomnia research and how to cope with hypersomnia through the use of behavioral sleep medicine, as well as other fabulous topics. Listed below are the speakers and their topics.

 SPEAKERS AND TOPICS

Isabelle Arnulf, MD

Double-blind drug studies in France to treat idiopathic hypersomnia

Richard Bogan, MD

The long and winding road from drug discovery to FDA approval: participating in clinical trials

Michel Lecendreux, MD

What does hypersomnolence look like in children and adolescents?

Jason Ong, PhD

How to live with hypersomnia today: incorporating behavioral sleep medicine in the treatment of central disorders of hypersomnolence

David Rye, MD, PhD

What are the latest developments in research on idiopathic hypersomnia?

Lynn Marie Trotti, MD, MSc

Information is power! Contributing to the Registry of Central Disorders of Hypersomnolence at CoRDS

Q&A

Available only to those who attend the meeting in person. We will not be streaming this portion of the program.

As of today, rooms are still available at the Embassy Suites Hotel, 1420 Stout Street, Denver, CO. Call 303.592.1000 or go on line to www.denverdowntown.embassysuites.com to reserve your room.

Copy the following link onto your browser to see where this fabulous conference will be held http://www.hilton.com/en/hotels/content/DENESES/media/pdf/en_DENESES_denesmeetings.pdf

Posted in: BeyondSleepy, Conference, Hypersomnia, idiopathic hypersomna, Kleine-Levin syndrome, narcolepsy, SomnusNooze

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