Hypersomnia Foundation

Archive for 'Uncategorized'

2017 #BeyondSleepy in Boston

Hypersomnia Foundation Regional Conference on June 4th

The Hypersomnia Foundation (HF) board is finalizing the program for its 2017 Boston Regional Conference. We will provide Eventbrite registration details in the near future via Facebook, Twitter and Somnusnooze.

Information below will help you begin making your travel plans to Boston. Read to the bottom for information on special hotel accommodations!


Conference Schedule (As always, social activities are optional):

Saturday – June 3

  • 2:00-4:00PM-Old Town Trolley Tour https://www.trolleytours.com/boston#home-section  
  • Survey responders voted the trolley tour #1 choice for our Saturday afternoon activity.  Sit back, relax and discover all that Boston has to offer by means of this sightseeing tour!  Group booking arrangements will be available through our Eventbrite once it is live, and we anticipate the per person rate will not exceed $36.00 (seating will be limited).
  • 7:30PM – Meet and Greet Game Night
  • Enjoy a casual meet and greet with light snacks and games hosted by the HF Board at the Residence Inn Boston Harbor on Tudor Wharf.This event is FREE but you will need to register once our Eventbrite is live.

Sunday-June 4

  • 1:00-4:30PM – HF Regional Conference at the historic Boston Public Library at Copley Square, 700 Boylston St., Boston, MA 02116
  • We have booked Rabb Lecture Hall in the newly renovated Johnson Building at the Boston Public Library for another fabulous regional conference featuring dynamic speakers.In this state-of-the-art facility, our outstanding speakers will cover research updates on idiopathic hypersomnia and related disorders. This year’s conference, however, will also focus on advocacy and empowerment to assist people with hypersomnia and their supporters navigate this world living with a chronic, rare disorder.

COST OF CONFERENCE ATTENDANCE - We understand Boston can be pricey. With this in mind, we have been hard at work negotiating the perfect location and space for our conference. The stars aligned and this year attendance to this event will be FREE!
Due to limited space you will need to register for the conference once the Eventbrite is live.

At this moment we are not 100% certain that Livestreaming the event will be possible, but are working diligently to identify sponsorship to help cover AV and Livestreaming costs. Watch for updates.

Hotel Accommodations – For Saturday night, June 3rd, The Residence Inn Boston Harbor on Tudor Wharf has offered a special group rate of $289.00 USD per night (plus tax) for a studio suite.   All rooms include complimentary breakfast and in-room high-speed internet access.  These discounted rooms are limited and we cannot stress enough to book early!

This Residence Inn has generously agreed to offer this same rate for a limited number of rooms for Friday (June 2) and Sunday (June 4) nights as well.

To make a reservation guests can either call 800-331-3131 to the central reservation team (be sure to mention the Hypersomnia Foundation room block) or book online through this link:

Book your group rate for Hypersomnia Foundation

With specific hotel questions please contact Dory Noll at the Residence Inn,
at 617-933-5313 and she will be happy to assist you.

Details about registration for the Saturday trolley tour and the meet and greet, as well as for Sunday’s Regional Conference will be highlighted in a future SomnusNooze once program details have been finalized.

We look forward to connecting with everyone in Boston!

Posted in: BeyondSleepy, Conference, SomnusNooze, Uncategorized

Leave a Comment (0) →

Livin’ the Dream

Livin’ the Dream

Or maybe dream living? I’ve never been a morning person. Mom would drop me off at the door by my first hour seconds before the bell rang. Neighbors that I carpooled with to grade school called me Molasses. My birth certificate says Melissa. Everyone knows I will be late to EVERYTHING.

I stay up all night cleaning because that’s when energy strikes and the fog lifts. Conversely, if I choose instead to go to bed I’ll fall asleep immediately. Mornings, and just the thought of them, terrify me. No amount of sleep, hours or days, refreshes me. I used to get up at the same time dreamwith no alarm. Now, if I hear it, it’s like a dream fragment that I’m never sure actually happened. My dad calls me every morning to help wake me up. These conversations have the same wispy, unreal quality.

The physical act of leaving the bed while my brain is wrapped in rolls of bubble wrap is the single most difficult task I have ever faced. And I’ve had 3 hip replacements and had my first surgery at 18 months old. In fact the state of my brain when trying to wake reminds me of the last second before anesthesia steals you or the first moments it lets you go. Once I leave the bed, conversation is not an option. The words may float around in my head but they ain’t coming out. So I do the hair and makeup thing, and I’ve realized that the act of making myself look awake helps me feel normal. Not less sleepy, just human.

I would give just about anything to wake up refreshed again. To look forward to going places and seeing people. My house used to look like Halloween or Christmas threw up in here. I can’t make myself just switch out summer candles for fall. Got meat in the freezer from March – July. Yeah I know, yikes! I haven’t cooked my family a real meal in months. And I have no appetite either. Anyone else have that?

So I float thru every day in this dreamlike fog, forgetting the thought I had a second ago, practically begging doctors to find something horrible wrong with me, desperately wanting sleep and hating it with a passion, as well as a body that seems to have turned on me, trying stimulants and wake-up meds, feeling like a loser for getting to the office at 11:30, forgetting to pay bills, not going to the grocery store, being too tired to give my cat her medicine, being overrun by laundry, telling my sister no I can’t take you to urgent care, throwing my hair up in a ponytail because I’m too tired to wash it, being suspicious of “good” days and cramming a million things into them because tomorrow is an unknown bitch that more than likely will kick my ass again.

 

Melissa Morrow

Oak Grove, MO

Posted in: Uncategorized

Leave a Comment (0) →

Beyond Sleepy in Boston: the 2017 Hypersomnia Foundation Regional Conference

SAVE the DATE

June 3 and 4, 2017

bpl

We have booked Rabb Hall at the Boston Library for another fabulous regional conference featuring dynamic speakers on Sunday afternoon, June 4, 2017. In this completely renovated, state-of-the-art, yet historic facility, our outstanding speakers will cover all of the latest research on idiopathic hypersomnia and related disorders. In addition, we have planned social events on Saturday afternoon, Saturday evening, and Sunday morning to connect with friends old and new.

Boston has so much to offer, and we would like your input regarding what you would like to do. Please respond to the survey linked here (https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/BeyondSleepy2017) to provide your feedback. Completing this very brief survey is not a commitment that you will attend the conference, but we would like to get an idea about numbers of people to anticipate, as well as to set aside an adequate room block and select your preferred social events.

Note that the costs quoted in the survey are estimates of actual costs, since pricing can change depending on the number of people who will book a hotel room and how many people will participate in the activities. Please complete this short survey by October 19, 2017. Registration will open on November 15th.

Posted in: Uncategorized

Leave a Comment (0) →

Service Dogs – Part 2: Different Types and What They Do

Many people are surprised to learn there are more than a dozen different specializations for service dogs. There are diabetic alert dogs, severe allergy alert dogs, visual assistance dogs, hearing dogs for the deaf, wheelchair assistance dogs, psychiatric service dogs, brace/mobility support dogs, medical alert dogs, seizure assistance dogs, and dogs for autism, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and more.

According to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA, 1990), a dog is considered a “service dog” if it has been “individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of a person with a disability.” A disability is a “mental or physical condition which substantially limits a major life activity.” Examples include the following:

  • Caring for one’s self
  • Performing manual tasks
  • Walking
  • Seeing
  • Hearing
  • Speaking
  • Breathing
  • Learning
  • Working

Other disabilities may not be visible.

  • Deafness
  • Epilepsy
  • Psychiatric conditions
  • Diabetes

To be considered a service dog, the dog must be trained to perform tasks
directly related to the person’s disability. Some service dogs perform two or more functions for their disabled handler, such as a brace / mobility support dog and a seizure assistance dog. There isn’t a clear way to classify all types of service dogs, nor is classification particularly important under the ADA as long as the dog is a service dog. The dog’s type, function, title, or classification is usually left up to the dog’s handler. The following are some ways in which service dogs can assist their handlers.

Allergy Alert: The service dog can alert its handler to life-threatening allergens that may be in the area, especially tree nuts, gluten, or shellfish.

Autism Assistance: The service dog can help to calm or ground an individual who has autism via tactile or deep pressure stimulation. The dog may also assist in teaching life skills, maintaining boundaries, or finding a “runner.”

Mobility Support / Wheelchair: A brace/mobility support dog works to provide bracing or counterbalancing to a partner who has balance issues due to a disability. Many brace/mobility support dogs also retrieve, open/close doors, or do other tasks to assist in day-to-day life or in an emergency. Dogs may also assist their partner by retrieving dropped objects, opening doors, retrieving the phone, helping with transfers, or doing anything else their partner may need.

Diabetic alert: These dogs can alert their handler to dangerous or potentially deadly blood sugar highs and lows. Many dogs are trained to call 911 on a special K-9 Alert phone if their partner cannot be roused.

Hearing Assistance: Hearing assistance dogs can alert their deaf handler to environmental sounds, including, but not limited to, alarms, doorbells, knocking, phones, cars, or their name.

Medical Alert: These dogs are trained to alert their handler to dangerous physiologic changes. such as spikes or drops in blood pressure, hormone levels or some other parameter or to recognized an identifiable symptom.

Psychiatric Service: Psychiatric service dogs assist their handler with a psychiatric disability such as anxiety, depression or PTSD via specific trained tasks.

Seizure Response: These dogs respond to their handler’s seizures via trained tasks. The dog may retrieve medication, utilize deep pressure stimulation to end a seizure early, fetch a nearby person to help or call 911.

Visual Assistance: Also know as guide dogs, these animals help their visually impaired or blind handler to navigate the world.

untitledKimberly Brenowitz is the Master Trainer with Animals Deserve Better, Inc. and Paws for Life in Marietta, GA. She can be reached at adb@animalsdeservebetter.com.

The first part of this series is available at http://www.hypersomniafoundation.org/serviceanimals-pt1/

Posted in: Uncategorized

Leave a Comment (0) →

Midyear Recap

Can you believe that 2016 is almost half over? It’s been a very busy year at the Hypersomnia calendarFoundation, where volunteers have been hard at work establishing new programs and bringing you the latest information on the central disorders of
hypersomnolence—primarily idiopathic hypersomnia, but also narcolepsy and Kleine-Levin syndrome. In case you’ve missed anything, here is a brief summary.

  •  Attendance at Beyond Sleepy in the Mile High City far exceeded our expectations—we anticipated 50 people, planned for 75, and hosted 81 in Denver! Keeping our fingers crossed that the Livestream version would be well received, we hoped for 500 to 750 people to tune in. Wow, more than 1100 people viewed the program live, with an additional 235 having watched the recording in the past week. Not surprisingly, slightly more than 70% of people watched from the US. However, folks from Australia, Norway, France, the UK, and seven other countries also participated. Thanks to a volunteer, we were able to take questions from anyone who had a twitter account, and most of the questions were answered during the Q&A session, which was ultimately included in the Livestream broadcast. If you missed the program, please sign up at http://www.hypersomniafoundation.org/2016-hypersomnia-regional-conference-register/ and watch as many times as you like or invite your family and friends to participate.
  • You are reading our 100th issue of SomnusNooze, the Foundation’s weekly free Celebrating_100_issueelectronic newsletter. Today, it landed in 1282 inboxes, which is up by more than 25% since the first of the year. If you have friends, colleagues, classmates, teachers or family members who would benefit from learning about the latest research regarding hypersomnia or understanding from reading what it is like to live with hypersomnia, encourage them to subscribe to SomnusNooze at http://www.hypersomniafoundation.org/
  • We will be implementing a new feature in SomnusNooze called Ask the Doctor. Members of the Medical Advisory Board have graciously offered to answer your general questions about central disorders of hypersomnolence. Of course, they won’t be able to answer specific questions regarding individual treatments or conditions. Please send your questions to AskTheDoctor@hypersomniafoundation.org
  • After years of endless revisions and input from researchers, physicians, people with various forms of central disorders or hypersomnolence, and CoRDS personnel, we have launched the Hypersomnia Foundation Registry at CoRDS. This registry will form the backbone of many future research projects to be conducted by scientists from throughout the world. Your participation in the registry will garner new insights into the disease processes and help scientists better understand the differences among the various hypersomnia disorders. Please sign up today at http://www.sanfordresearch.org/cords/ to help solve the puzzle of hypersomnia. For more information, please visit the June 14, 2016, issue of SomnusNooze.
  • This month, the Hypersomnia Foundation was the recipient of a grant from the Trip Advisor Charitable Foundation to increase awareness of hypersomnia. We are most appreciative of these funds, which will allow us to update our website and enhance our social media presence. 
  • The Hypersomnia Foundation has sought the input of a broad swath of the hypersomnia community in various ways over the past six months. With the launch of the PAAC, the People with Hypersomnia and Advocates Advisory Council, we have developed a means to boost communication with our constituents. In addition, last month’s survey, to which 192 people responded, is the first of what will be many surveys to elicit your input. You gave us a clear mandate that research and increasing awareness among the public and physicians are your priorities for the coming the year.

Not only do the members of the Board of Directors work tirelessly on your behalf, but they also all make the Hypersomnia Foundation a priority in their charitable giving. However, we can’t do it alone. Although we understand that not everyone has the means to simply write a check or transfer an appreciated stock, the continued success of the Hypersomnia Foundation is dependent upon your financial support. We offer you here several additional creative ways to support our continued efforts to meet these challenges you have set ourt for us.

Company Matching Gifts – Several donors have employers who match their gifts to the Hypersomnia Foundation – even a small donation makes a big difference when you double the opportunity to support people with hypersomnia!

Recurring donations through credit card or PayPal – A small monthly gift certainly adds up over time and is easy when you set it up to occur automatically. You don’t have to remember to make that payment, but what you can remember is the impact you will have on the hypersomnia community through your support.

Employee-Advised Grants – We received the grant from the Trip Advisor Charitable Foundation when a dedicated Hypersomnia Foundation volunteer nominated us late last year for her company’s giving program. We were invited to submit a proposal and make a presentation, which resulted in the aforementioned funds to increase awareness of hypersomnia among the general public and physicians. Perhaps your company has a similar program and a simple inquiry can make a world of difference

Friends and family helping friends and family – Many of the donations that we receive are in honor of someone who has hypersomnia. Talk about spreading the love!

AmazonSmile – Do you shop ANYTHING Amazon? If you designate the Hypersomnia Foundation as your charity of choice at amazon.smile.com, Amazon will donate a percentage of your eligible purchases to the Hypersomnia Foundation at absolutely no cost to you. Last year we were received several hundred dollars from AmazonSmile. Every bit counts!

Bravelets – A supporter set up a shop through Bravelets, where $10 from each item purchased is being donated to the Hypersomnia Foundation. When she set up the campaign, the supporter sent us this note, “Welcome! I came across this wonderful website a couple weeks ago. There are so many great fundraisers already started, but I noticed there was not one for hypersomnia yet! As someone who was diagnosed with hypersomnia, I know how hard it can be to be brave in the face of this frustrating and sometimes confusing illness. Please join me in spreading the word and helping the Hypersomnia Foundation.” https://www.bravelets.com/bravepage/hypersomnia-awareness-bravelets

Do you have a creative way of giving to the Hypersomnia Foundation? Please let us know, and we will gladly share it with others in an upcoming edition of SomnusNooze.

Posted in: Uncategorized

Leave a Comment (0) →

Mark Your Calendar, Set Your Alarm, and Register Today

June 12, 2016, is the date. Noon Mountain Daylight Time (MDT) is the time. And, as promised, registration for the alarmLivestream feed of Beyond Sleepy in the Mile High City: a Hypersomnia Foundation Regional Conference is now  open. Thanks to the generous support of our sponsors—Balance Therapeutics, Inc., and Flamel Technologies, SA—you, your family, friends, classmates, teachers, coworkers, and anyone else you would like to invite can attend this broadcast of the event free of charge. However, you will have to provide your own refreshments during the 2:00 break.

This unique program is an opportunity for you to hear the latest research about idiopathic hypersomnia (IH), learn behavioral techniques to live better with IH, and find out how you can help to advance the science and treatment of IH by participating in research studies and the Hypersomnia Foundation registry. Have you ever had difficulty explaining IH to your friends or family members? Do your coworkers and the HR department struggle with understanding why you might need an accommodation to come in a little later or to work a flexible schedule? If so, we encourage all of the important people in your life to join you in watching, or invite them to tune in from wherever they might be to, Beyond Sleepy in the Mile High City: a Hypersomnia Foundation Regional Conference.

Registration is simple.

Anytime before noon MDT on June 12, 2016, you can register for the Livestream feed. It is recommended that you complete registration using the device that you will be using to watch Beyond Sleepy on the 12th.

Please follow these steps to register:

  1. Click on this link, or go to http://www.hypersomniafoundation.org/register/ and complete the entire registration.
  2. Select and enter a username.
  3. Enter an active email address of an account that you check frequently.online registration
  4. Select and enter a password that is a combination of at least seven letters or numbers.
  5. Enter your first and last names.
  6. Click Register.
  7. You will be redirected to a confirmation page.
  8. That’s it; you are registered!
  9. You will receive an email message containing the account information you will need if you have to manually log into the Livestream feed of the conference on the 12th. If you do not receive this email message, please check your spam or junk mail folder.

On June 12th, simply go to http://www.hypersomniafoundation.org/login. If you are using the same device with which you completed the registration process, you should be automatically logged in and redirected to the Beyond Sleepy in the Mile High City Livestream feed. However, depending on your computer settings, you may be required to log into the system manually. To do so, enter the username and password you provided during registration if prompted to do so on this login page. 


 A very few tickets are available for the in-person Beyond Sleepy in the Mile High City: a Hypersomnia Foundation Regional Conference on June 12, 2016, in Denver, CO. For more information and to register, please visit http://www.hypersomniafoundation.org/2016-hypersomnia-regional-conference.

Posted in: Uncategorized

Leave a Comment (0) →

Sleep Disorders and Your Job – What To Do When The Writing’s On The Wall

Social Security Disability Series: Part 1

Sleep Disorders and Your Job  – What To Do When The Writing’s On The Wall

By Anjel Burgess, JD

Jennie is a 40-year-old single mother of two children who has been working for 10 years as a data entry clerk. Jennie Jennie - disabilitywas diagnosed with idiopathic hypersomnia one year ago and has been working with her doctor to try and manage her progressively worsening symptoms. Over the last year, they have tried every medication conceivable, and her current medications have her optimal productivity time at about 3 hours. Jennie has been arriving to work late, struggling to stay awake at work, and sneaking breaks throughout the day to rest and is only able to be productive for about 3 hours throughout the day. Her supervisor has found her asleep at her desk on multiple occasions, and Jennie finds that her once impeccable work product is now riddled with errors. She was recently written up for performance-related concerns, which means that, at this point, the writing is on the wall. With a family to provide for and medical treatment that is vital to receive, Jennie is concerned that she will be fired. She has consulted with her employer, and has been told that she has the following options available to her:

  1. FMLA (Family Medical Leave Act) – This is unpaid job-protected leave of up to 12 weeks for employees who have a serious health condition that makes the employees unable to perform essential functions of their jobs.
  2. Short-term disability – These benefits are often made available by the employer, but private policies are also available. Short-term disability policies provide benefits after a short waiting period of 7 to 30 days, once the insurance company has documentation that employees are unable to perform their duties. Short-term disability programs typically pay 60% of the benefit salary and may be available for 3 months to a period of years.
  3. Long-term disability – These benefits may be available through the employer or a private policy. These policies typically provide benefits after a 180-day waiting period and typically pay 60% of an employee’s benefit salary. Long-term disability benefits may be available through full retirement age.

In Jennie’s case, her best option is to apply for short-term disability, with a plan to apply for long-term disability benefits once her short-term disability benefits are exhausted. Once she leaves work to begin her short-term disability benefits, Jennie should also apply for Social Security disability benefits.

Social Security disability – Jennie is eligible for Social Security disability benefits based on her work history. Through her employer, Jennie has been paying FICA taxes, which makes her eligible for financial assistance and health insurance through Social Security disability in the event that she becomes disabled and is unable to work for a year or more. Since the process for Social Security benefits typically takes two years to complete, it is in Jennie’s best interest to apply as soon as she stops working so that she can ensure that her financial support from short-term and long-term disability will carry her through while she waits for the process to be completed.

If you, too, are struggling to maintain your employment due to the symptoms flowing from idiopathic hypersomnia or any sleep disorder, don’t wait until the writing is on the wall for your termination. Secure your eligibility for short-term disability and long-term disability benefits today through your employer. Contact a qualified Social Security Disability Attorney to assist you with an application for benefits.  

Anjel Burgess is a partner/attorney at the Law Firm of Burgess and Christensen located in Marietta, GA. She exclusively practices Social Security Disability Law for adults and children, as well as the ancillary areas of Guardianships and Special Needs Trusts. By doing so, she has been able to make a positive difference in the daily lives of people who need help the most. You may reach her at Anjel@DisabilityHelpLine.com or 770-422-8111. You can learn more about her services at www.DisabilityHelpLine.com.

Posted in: Uncategorized

Leave a Comment (0) →

Her

All I can say is my admiration for those that suffer with idiopathic hypersomnia (IH) is truly immense. I love an IH sufferer, and even though she fights every day just to participate and contribute, she still shares humor and kisses like smuggled chocolate drops in a dreary math’s lesson.

sleeping woman Some days you can see the drugs are in slow mo, and all you want to do is wrap your arms around her and pump her up with the normalcy of simply feeling awake. Every tomorrow brings fresh hope she will make it all the way to the end without a crippling migraine, or be slam dunked by a drooling sleep fest, stealing away her hard-earned achievements … Or worse still… a cruel and soul-destroying comment from an ignorant and narrow-minded baboon stewing in his ungrateful and wasted soup of well-being. Stupidly, he mistakes her for lazy, slow, or disconnected, having no idea that he has just had an encounter with a rare warrior—one who wins and conquers life one precious moment at a time in a world where whole years are abandoned and forgotten. She, so young, has learnt how to manage a bigger load, invisible to the untrained eye, with finite stamina, measuring routine activities carefully with brave grit and frowned-faced fortitude.

Yet, as I watch her slow drunkard-like stance, slowly mobilizing each muscle to reach vertical every morning, I no longer feel that dark despair and loss. I am now infused with hope, amused and bewildered by how love curled by pain for so long can march you back up a cranky forgiving road to welcome in our new norm. Two adult women, cradling acceptance and insistence, seesawing between the two, me and her, mother and daughter.

Anonymous Supporter

Posted in: Awareness, BeyondSleepy, Hypersomnia, idiopathic hypersomna, SomnusNooze, Uncategorized

Leave a Comment (0) →

What Is It Like to Participate in a Clinical Trial?

“I don’t want to do it,” I said to my mom as we entered the elevator. “Let’s just go talk to them,” she replied to my dismay. I didn’t want to be there. I didn’t want to have hypersomnia. I didn’t want to do a clinical trial—it sounded so exam roomscary and so unknown.

When we entered the office though, it was not a scary place. Everyone working there—the doctors, clinical coordinators, and nurses—were all so incredibly friendly. They were so excited to enroll people in the trial. They took all of the time we needed and answered our long list of questions. They went over every detail with us and explained the whole process. My mind on participating in the clinical trial suddenly began to change.

I decided to enroll, but, even after agreeing to it, I still had my doubts. Was it really worth the time? Was it worth not being on any other medications? Was I really going to make a difference?

Having now successfully completed the trial I can honestly tell you that YES, it was worth it! A million times over. I believe my participation did make a difference, and I am hopeful that my results will help clear the path for newer, more-effective medications than the ones we currently have.

Have you ever thought about participating in a clinical trial? Maybe you haven’t because you’ve had some of the same concerns I had. Maybe you are fearful because you just don’t know what to expect. I hope that by sharing my experience I might encourage you to take the plunge. 

During the trial you will have a set schedule to follow. Knowing this, I worried about how it might interfere with other things that were already on my calendar. The team worked with me and helped me plan my calendar out so that I was able to follow the protocol dates and also be free for Thanksgiving, my sister’s graduation, and other visits with family and friends, and my trial was completed by Christmas!

About every other week, I went to the clinic for a visit. This consisted of a quick physical, completing surveys, and usually a blood draw and urine sample. This may sound like a pain—doctors’ appointments are usually not fun, so why would you want to sign up for even more?! They did not seem like doctors’ appointments at all! I looked forward to these days because I got to go see everyone at the office who quickly did not seem just like my doctors, nurses, and coordinators, but as my friends. I was excited to let them know every week how I was doing because they genuinely cared and wanted to help find a medicine that would help me just as much as I wanted it.


The worst part of the whole process was the sleep studies. Nighttime sleep studies are a piece of cake! 
Hook me up and I am right asleep. But daytime sleep studies (technically called Multiple Sleep Latency Tests or MSLTs)—ugh! For wired upanyone with hypersomnia who has experienced a daytime sleep study, I am sure that you can agree with me that they are a certain form of torture! Not being able to sleep when our bodies so badly want to—horrible! But it was worth it.

Throughout the entire process, the team was very helpful. They answered phone calls and emails from me with questions at all hours of the day. They check up on you and always let you know that they are there for you.

I will not tell you that it was easy. There were times when I wanted to quit, and it is a commitment that takes some time. You will have a set schedule to follow. You will have some overnight and all-day sleep studies. You will have clinic visits and diaries to complete. But it sounds much harder and much more time consuming than it really is! I promise!

The best thing about being in the clinical trial is that yes, even me, one sleepy head who didn’t think she could make a difference, did. Whether this medication is a miracle drug or a complete bust, I helped with knowing that. I helped in studying hypersomnia and in someday finding medication or even a cure for hypersomnia. When I was completely grumpy and mad from not being able to sleep at a daytime study or my veins were a bit bruised from blood draws, I only had to remind myself of this to keep going. Hypersomnia changed my life. It took finishing college away from me for the time being. It has taken friendships and changed my social life. It tests me daily and has pushed me mentally and emotionally. But it cannot take away hope and it cannot take away the fight to find medicines and one day a cure that will give us all our lives back. Being in this trial was a way for me to show this. No matter how many hours a day I need to sleep or how tired I am, I can take the time and make the commitment to participate in the trial because every person enrolled is a huge step forward for all of us.

Meghan Mallare
Roanoke, VA

 Conference rectangle Image

Learn about the latest hypersomnia research on June 12th at the Hypersomnia Foundation’s regional conference, Beyond Sleepy in the Mile High City. Scientists will share findings from their recently completed clinical trials and other ongoing studies, lead us on a journey through the drug discovery and approval process, and help us to cope with the daily struggles of hypersomnia. You will also learn how your future participation in the registry can help to solve the puzzle of hypersomnia.

Order your $25 ticket on line to join us in person in Denver or wait until June 1 to sign up for a live Internet stream of the conference, brought to you free of charge through the generous support of Balance Therapeutics, Inc., and Flamel Technologies, SA.

 

Posted in: Uncategorized

Leave a Comment (0) →

Connect at the Conference

connect

Building on last year’s successful conference, the Hypersomnia Foundation will once again host a number of prominent clinicians and medical researchers to speak at our meeting in Denver on June 12th!

“Beyond Sleepy in the Mile High City” will feature dynamic speakers on topics such as recent clinical trials, coping with hypersomnia, IH issues related to children and teens, and more.

Perhaps just as important, this gathering at the Embassy
Suites in Denver is an opportunity to connect. “It’s a relief,” said one conference attendee last summer, “just to be in a room with people who understand. I don’t need to explain or defend my hypersomnia symptoms. It’s wonderful!”

Who has supported you as you cope with hypersomnia? Is it someone you expected would be there for you, or was it someone else – someone who surprised you by reaching out to offer support?

Treat yourself to a day in Denver – surround yourself with compassionate peers, and hear renowned researchers discuss the latest developments in hypersomnia.

DID YOU KNOW — one day soon, you could play an important role in future hypersomnia research!  The Hypersomnia Foundation is developing a patient registry that will launch in the coming months. Once the registry is up and running, you can help researchers find clues to hypersomnia and determine new directions for research, just by answering questions about your symptoms. Find out more on June 12th at “Beyond Sleepy in the Mile High City” – at the Embassy Suites in Denver, Colorado.

Tickets are limited.  To purchase, visit http://www.hypersomniafoundation.org/2016-hypersomnia-regional-conference/

Posted in: Uncategorized

Leave a Comment (0) →
Page 1 of 5 12345